Archive of ‘Wellness’ category

How Can Chiropractic Care Help with Symptoms of Dementia?

Degenerative diseases of the brain are becoming common with the elderly. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, one out of three seniors dies with a degenerative brain disorder like Alzheimer’s or dementia. In the last two decades, deaths from Alzheimer’s have grown by almost 150%. It’s no secret that dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease are serious problems that require serious care. And, in the same study regarding Alzheimer’s Disease, half of primary care physicians believe that the health-care industry is not prepared to handle the onslaught of dementia.

Symptoms of Dementia

Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease have similar symptoms. Common symptoms include memory loss, concentration problems, confusion with familiar tasks, difficulty communicating, mood changes, and anxiety.

Types of Dementia

There are several types of dementia, not just Alzheimer’s. Most involve memory loss and confusion, but they manifest with other problems. For example, vascular dementia also include problems that look like stroke side effects, like difficulty walking, temporary paralysis, and other movement problems. Another type of dementia includes Lewy bodies. People with this diagnosis will have periods of being alert, then suddenly drowsy. They also have visual hallucinations and are likely to fall. The other type of dementia is frontotemporal, which manifests in a changed personality where the patient does not know how to behave in a socially appropriate way. People with frontotemporal dementia often struggle to communicate and they become obsessive. As people move through the stages of dementia, they lose their social awareness, their personalities change, and lose bladder and bowel control. Most people with dementia problems are over age 65, but there are younger people between 45 and 65 who show signs of the growing problem.

Growth of Dementia Diagnoses

Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease have both been studied extensively in recent years. Dementia diseases do not have cures, but researchers believe that the cure is somewhere in the brain. There are several ways to treat dementia and Alzheimer’s, but the diseases will continue to run their course until the patient is no longer living. Dementia – the degenerative brain disease – is practically at an epidemic level, as the growth over the last twenty years shows. Fortunately, there are treatments available, including chiropractic care. When you recognize how chiropractic care works, it becomes easy to see why a neurological problem like dementia can be treated with a health-care program that values the spine.

Causes and Prevention

The latest research shows that there are several factors that increase the risk of developing dementia. They include hypertension, hearing impairments, diabetes, social isolation, excessive alcohol consumption, smoking, obesity, head injury, physical inactivity, and air pollution.
Research also shows that prevention for dementia should start at a young age and continue through the elder years. All children should receive primary and secondary education. The dangers of drinking alcohol and smoking cigarettes should be shared with the public so people will avoid both to reduce their risks of developing dementia. Public health should train people to eat healthy foods so they avoid developing type-2 diabetes and other obesity-related problems. With healthy diets, people sleep better and are less likely to develop hypertension.

It is also important for people who need hearing aids to get them. Hearing loss is often a precursor to dementia. Finally, people should be able to live in communities that do not have excessive air pollution and homes should be free of second-hand smoke. Dementia care should include multidimensional treatments for the whole body. And, this is where chiropractic care comes into play. Many dementia patients take medications, but they only cover the problem, not solve it. Because so many people have dementia, Medicare is covering chiropractic care as a treatment because the care has proven to improve health, cognitive function, and life in general.

How Chiropractic Care Helps People with Dementia

Chiropractic care is dedicated to the maintenance of the central nervous system including the brain and spinal cord. Dementia and Alzheimer’s are degenerative brain disorders, so chiropractic care directly affects parts of the body affected by these diseases.

Feeding the Brain

There is research that shows the brain needs to have certain nutrients to function properly. When those nutrients are blocked, the brain changes and loses certain functions. When there are subluxations or misalignments in the spine, the body and the brain do not work as they should. Chiropractic care realigns the spine by removing the subluxations. The result is that
nerves can operate properly so nutrients can reach the brain, returning the spine and brain to normal function.

Typical Treatment Options

At this point, chiropractic care does not cure dementia or Alzheimer’s, but it does serve as a realistic treatment. Chiropractors work with patients who have problems with spine-related pain, joint stiffness, and extremity pain. Research shows that many of those problems manifest themselves as acute pain or restricted mobility. Most chiropractors use similar treatments:
● Myofascial therapies
● Ischemic compression
● Mechanical percussion
● Muscle stretching
● Thrust manipulation

Collaborative Changes to Meet Patient Needs

Patients who needed neurorehabilitation usually needed treatments that were different from the typical movement-related choices. According to research, people who needed chiropractic care for neurological conditions, like dementia, had chiropractors who developed collaborative plans with other health care providers. The programs required longer visits and non-standard treatment ideas. Chiropractors had to adapt to each patient’s cognitive issues and problems with communication.

Slowing Memory Loss

Chiropractic care is not a miracle solution for any degenerative brain disease, but it can help ease the symptoms. Some patients have found that chiropractic care has slowed their memory loss. Chiropractic care will not bring back lost memories, but research shows that thoughtful,
collaborative chiropractic will help maintain the status quo. Chiropractic care also helps improve musculoskeletal function in dementia patients.


If you have a loved one who is suffering through a type of dementia, you want the best for them. Rather than watching them go through the daily struggles, a chiropractor might be able to help slow the speed of degeneration. Your health care provider and a chiropractor can work together to improve your loved one’s quality of life, even in just a small way.

If you or a loved one is suffering from dementia check out this blog about counseling services for dementia related concerns.

Written By: Dr. Brent Wells.
Dr. Brent Wells, D.C. founded Better Health Chiropractic & Physical Rehab and has been a chiropractor for over 20 years. His chiropractic practice has treated thousands of Juneau patients from different health problems using services designed to help give long-lasting relief. Dr. Wells is also the author of over 700 online health articles that have been featured on sites such as Dr. Axe, Organic Facts, and Thrive Global. He is a proud member of the American Chiropractic Association and the American Academy of Spine Physicians. And he continues his education to remain active and updated in all studies related to neurology, physical rehab, biomechanics, spine conditions, brain injury trauma, and more.



Kings & Queens: Tips from a Therapist on Coming Out

In honor of October being Coming Out Month, I wanted to write a blog very near and dear to my heart. Easily over half of my clients identify as LGBT, non-traditional, non-monogamous, and have some form of a coming out story. Whether they did not feel attracted to the opposite sex, they did not identify as the sex they were born, or the idea of a traditional monogamous marriage was not attractive to them, over 60% of my clients have had to go through the mystical, terrifying, and liberating experience of coming out. 

If you are questioning your sexuality, myself as well as the folks at Austin Family Counseling want to reassure you that you do not have to go through this alone. Coming out itself is a very isolating experience, and given the current pandemic, we need as little isolation as possible. Per my previous blog, social distancing does not mean emotional distancing. When a human comes out to their friends, family, and coworkers, their need for emotional support is so strong as it is one of the most vulnerable times of their lives. 

Below are helpful suggestions from an out-of-the-closet gay man turned therapist to the LGBT community of Texas who had his own share of struggles coming out in early adulthood. These tips are generalized as every person’s story is unique and beautifully different. 

Know Who Your Cheerleaders Are and Are Not

As the great Dr. Brene Brown talked about in her book “Daring Greatly”, all of us in some way, regardless of if we have a coming out history, are walking into some kind of arena in life. We are showing up and being seen, regardless of where we are. And in this metaphorical arena she has so beautifully drawn, all of us have the Support Section. This is the section closest to the arena where the cheerleaders in our lives belong—the people who get the closest and most intimate perspective of our struggles. And these people we absolutely need in our lives when we come out.  Siblings are often the first people who non-heteronormative people come out to first. They can also be parents, close friends, teachers, counselors, mentors, and close relatives. Consider who is going to be cheering you on and in your corner when you come out. Messages like “This does not change how much I love you”, “We are still your friends regardless”, “We love you no matter what” are messages that ideally should be told to someone who is so vulnerable when coming out. 

Being someone’s cheerleader when they come out does NOT sound like: “Well, just don’t hit on me if you are gay”, “It’s okay, I won’t tell anybody”, or “It’s okay, God will forgive you.” There are sadly still families who disown their children for coming out, and in lieu of the recent banning of Conversion Therapy this is a form of emotional and psychological abuse that has no place in our current climate. 

Be Mindful of What Could Change

Since coming out can be such a freeing and liberating experience, it is almost counterintuitive to say that there can be “consequences”. As mentioned above, some families disown their relatives for coming out (the amount of homeless LGBTQ youth makes up 40% of the entire minor homeless population). Some workplaces still discriminate against LGBTQ employees for coming out at the workplace. Though we should ALL be able to live authentically as our out and proud selves, I know several clients and several close friends who have had an adverse experience when coming out to their friends and family. 

Be Mindful of Mental Health

Bias aside, it is almost always better if you have a therapist to stay with you during the coming out process. As mentioned, coming out can be very isolating and is linked to depression, anxiety, compromised immune systems, suicidal thoughts, and drug and alcohol abuse. In extreme cases, some people never come out of the closet and suffer from very high anxiety and feel obligated to live a double life which can be very harmful for mental and physical health. 

Bullying Sadly Still Exists in 2020

I am filled in by a lot of my queer teens and early adults who sadly experience an enormously high level of bullying both in person and through apps like Instagram and Snapchat. Teens who are forcibly outed are prone to suicidal thoughts, feelings of humiliation and embarrassment, and lower senses of self esteem. Having gone through my own fair share of bullying in high school, I am fully empathetic to how painful and scary repetitive bullying can be. 

Bullying for queer people can also be present in the adult world. As women, racial and cultural minorities, and persons with special needs can empathize with, bullying in the workplace is alarmingly common. Workplace discrimination based on sexual identity is still sadly alive and well. However, if bullying in any capacity (from coworkers, managers, supervisors, bosses, etc) is present, it is NEVER okay and does not need to be tolerated. 

FOR TEENS:

If you are an in-the-closet teen and reading this, please know I am here, I am with you, and I am here to help. I have been through some of the worst parts about coming out (before and after) and I can probably relate to the struggles of coming out in a world that is more straight-friendly. Please let me reassure you that you do not have to go through the process by yourself. One of my favorite kind of client is a teen who is going through the coming-out process as I was there not TOO long ago. 😊 If you are not in a place to tell your parents why you need counseling for coming out, feel free to email me at [email protected] with questions about resources I can give you—and there are plenty in Austin! 

Written by: Ian Hammonds, LPC, LMFT

Looking for more resources? Click here!


Tips From a Therapist: Finding the Right Therapeutic Fit

During COVID-19, our mental health matters a great deal. Though nearly all therapists at Austin Family Counseling are seeing clients virtually, finding the right therapist is more essential now than it has been. With the upcoming election, a lot of us need to put ourselves first. And this looks like finding a therapist who not only has the correct licenses and qualifications but also has the right personal fit. Studies show that regardless of the therapist’s education and acquired techniques, if the personality is too different than the client’s, very little therapeutic growth will happen in the relationship. 


What kinds of counselors work for different clients? Obviously, counselors have to be warm and empathic, but there have been instances where certain clients do not mesh well with certain counselors. Each counselor-client relationship has a different kind of synergy in the counseling room, and there are many different components that make for a great therapeutic process. Below are three main factors that go into making a therapeutic relationship between a therapist and a client work:

Personality Type

Typically, extraverted personalities gravitate toward other extraverted personalities. Just as introverted personalities, though more hidden than extraverts, gravitate toward introverted personalities. For example, extraverts have lower brain arousal and consistently search for higher stimulation in everyday life. If an extravert was seeing an introverted counselor and processed in session ways that they are seeking higher stimulation such as social events, an introvert would probably not be able to empathize as well as another extraverted therapist would.

Age Range

In many general inquiries, I will get clients seeking a therapist close to their age. While I do have a wide and diverse range of clients, most of the potential clients who ask for me specifically tend to be in my same age range. This is perhaps because clients need an empathetic presence to validate their life stages (starting a career or a business, graduating from college, starting a family, etc.). In some instances, having a younger therapist is at an advantage. Statistics show that families who go to family therapy have better results when the therapist is younger because the children of the family feel more validated and less ganged up on in session.

Therapeutic Approach

There is no one kind of therapeutic technique that works for every client. Each person walks into my office on the first visit with different experiences, different perspectives, and different realities. This is why that even though I have specific training on several main kinds of therapy, I allow my clients to tell me what they are comfortable with in the room. Some therapists have staunch views on what works for their clients, and other therapists have a more laidback, non-specific approach. I like to remain right in the middle of these two. No matter how much research there can be on one kind of therapeutic approach, there is always one client who will not be an ideal fit for it. With this understanding in mind, I maintain a firmly gentle approach, letting my clients do most of the work while still gently challenging them using various techniques I have learned.

Written By: Ian Hammonds, LPC, LMFT

Interested in learning more about what therapy looks like from the client’s perspective? Check out this blog!


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