Archive of ‘Self Help’ category

5 Categories of Self-Care

Self-care is a buzz word in today’s culture. Sometimes we don’t know where to being when trying to take care of ourselves in our busy world. Below are 5 categories of self-care to help you start out. The great thing is that the act of trying with self-care is a form of taking care of yourself. Take a look at the list and see what you are able to try this week.

Water

Hydrating your body with water has numerous physical and mental health benefits. It is recommended by nutritionists that a person drinks half their body weight in ounces of water each day. So that means if a person weighs 150 pounds, they are recommended to drink 75 ounces of water each day.

Nutrition

Nutrition is all about balance. Every human body has different nutritional needs. Becoming aware of what your body needs with nutrition will help your body function better, your mind to think clearer, and overall your ability to care for yourself increases.

Sleep

The category of sleep can be divided into bedtime routines, how long a person sleeps, and quality of sleep. Looking into how you put yourself to bed can shed light on how you are preparing your body for a good night’s rest. It is recommended that screen time is turned off at least 30 minutes before bedtime. How much sleep and the quality of sleep a person can get is dependent on a lot of factors. Take time to look at how this can be improved for your body, because your sleep pattern is unique to yourself. If quality of sleep feels beyond your control, contact your doctor to get more information.

Activity

Activity is an important category of self-care because of how quickly it addressed both physical and mental health. Activity can be defined as any movement that is more than your body’s resting position. For myself as a therapist, I spend most of the day sitting. Activity for me can be something as simple as standing. When activity turns into exercise this is when your brain pumps all of the happy hormones, like endorphins. Any form of activity is welcomed when trying to add more self-care.

Social

Social activity for self-care is based on what a person needs. Taking time to listen to your body will help you decide what kind of social interactions you are needing. Sometimes a person needs alone time away from the social scene to recharge. Other social needs could be knowing if you need to spend time with friends who are fun and are going to make you laugh, or if you need to spend time with friends who are able to listen and comfort you. Before making plans, take a moment to pause and listen to what your body needs before making a social decision.


Written by: Julie Smith, LMFT-A supervised by (Supervised by Kirby Schroeder MS, LMFT-S

Holiday Cheer or Holiday Drear

With holiday music playing in stores, Starbucks releasing their new holiday latte, and wreathes hanging on doors, I can’t help but anticipate the upcoming holiday season. And while society projects the holidays as a time of joy, parties, and wonderful family gatherings, it is important to remember that the holidays can be a very challenging time, particularly for those struggling with grief and loss, loneliness, illnesses, economic concerns, or relational issues like divorce and separation. Even individuals who aren’t struggling with the aforementioned concerns often feel overwhelmed by the unrealistic expectations, family strife, and to-do lists that seem to go along with this time of year. Additionally, many people report feeling down, or a sense of disappointment after the holiday hype.

By: Jennifer Alley, LPC

By: Jennifer Alley, LPC

Following are a list of suggestions to help you this holiday season:

  • Maintain your normal routines like exercising, sleeping, attending therapy sessions/group meetings, taking medication, spiritual/religious practices, and self-care activities as much as possible.
  • Stay in touch and reach out to supportive people in your life as stress/anxiety/depression comes up.
  • Set limits and boundaries when necessary to take care of yourself.
  • Try to set realistic goals and expectations for yourself and others. There is no such thing as the “perfect” holiday we often imagine.
  • Try to stay out of criticizing, judging, or comparing yourself to others. Comparison (think social media) leads to feeling isolated and not good enough.
  • Join a support group if you are struggling with mental illness, grief and loss, separation or divorce.
  • Talk about your feelings with people who care about you. Ask for what you need.

May: Mental Health Month

Mental Health America observes May as Mental Health Month, a program dedicated to raising recognition about the importance of mental health to overall health and wellness. Their theme for 2014 is “Mind Your Health.” This May, consider making 2-3 goals to increase your mental health and wellness. Just by making a few small changes, you can experience improved relationships, better physical and mental health, and feel greater joy and happiness.

Stay socially connected

To feel more happy and decrease the effects of stress, depression, and anxiety, remember to make plans with friends, share your problems and joys with others, listen and reach out to those in need of support, and have fun in social settings.

Consider:

  • Setting up weekly lunch or dinner dates with friends or loved ones
  • Connect daily or weekly with people you care about over the phone or through email
  • Plan at least one fun activity that is social each week

Sleep

Getting enough quality sleep is crucial for your mental and physical well-being. It helps you learn, process memories, restore energy, repair muscle tissue, and regulate hormones. Not getting enough sleep can lead to both physical and mental/emotional struggles and conditions.

Consider:

  • Going to bed at the same time each day
  • Avoiding watching TV or using technology in the last 30 minutes before bed as it can wake your brain
  • Exercising earlier in the day if possible as it often has a waking effect on the body

Reduce and control your stress

Life is stressful. Too much stress (or lack of ability/knowledge to manage it) can negatively impact your body by creating somatic issues (headaches, stomachaches, etc), emotional struggles (irritability, anxiety, depression, panic attacks, etc), difficulty sleeping, rise in blood pressure, weight gain or loss, and more.

Consider:

  • Meditating (check out the Headspace app- 10 minutes/day for 10 days series)
  • Exercising
  • Prioritizing and doing one thing at a time
  • Engaging in leisure time and hobbies
  • Sharing your feelings/stress with loved ones
  • Journaling
  • Setting realistic goals and say “no” when necessary
  • Decreasing or eliminating use of substances to avoid/numb/manage stress. Instead, use one of the above suggestions or seek professional help to manage difficulty in your life.

For more information and resources on Mental Health Month, visit http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net.